Law

Course title Advanced GCE in Law

Exam board OCR

Subject specific entry criteria No additional entry requirements

Course overview

Assessment overview

H415/01 Section A: English Legal System

In this unit, you will study the workings of the civil and criminal justice systems including the role of magistrates, solicitors, barristers and jurors

H415/01 Section B: Criminal Law

In this unit you will examine the individual elements of different crimes and defences. You will learn what the prosecution must prove in order to obtain convictions for offences such as murder and manslaughter etc.

H415/02 Section A: Law Making

In this unit you will learn how Parliament makes laws and how individual citizens can bring about changes and developments to the laws of England and Wales. You will even visit the Houses of Parliament!

H415/02 Section B: Law of Tort

This section covers civil laws such as negligence, nuisance and occupiers’ liability

H415/03 Section A: The Nature of Law

This unit looks at the nature of law in a wider context, developing an understanding of how law interacts with society, technology, morality and justice.

H415/03 Section B: Contract Law

This option focuses on the central elements of contract law from the formation of contracts to their enforcement

Unit H415/01 Examination in June in Year 13

One two-hour exam consisting of two sections – section A is a choice of two small essay questions from four on the English legal system (25%); section B is a choice of one scenario from two on Criminal law (75%). This paper constitutes 33.3% of the whole qualification.

Unit H415/02 Examination in June in Year 13

One two-hour exam consisting of two sections – section A is a choice of two small essay questions from four on Law Making (25%); section B is a choice of one scenario from two on the law of Tort (75%).   This paper constitutes 33.3% of the whole qualification.

 Unit H415/03 Examination in June in Year 13

One two-hour exam consisting of two sections – section A is a choice of one essay question from two on the Nature of Law (25%); section B is a choice of one scenario from two on Contract Law (75%).   This paper constitutes 33.3% of the whole qualification.

 

Future progression

Law is offered at most leading universities either on its own or in combination with many other subjects. Russell Group Universities will require a minimum of AAA or AAB for access to most Law degrees, usually with at least one other facilitating subject such as English, History, a Foreign Language or a Science. Other popular progression routes that may be accessed with an A Level in Law include criminology, forensic psychology and journalism.

Potential careers

Careers following a Law degree obviously include those of a barrister or solicitor but for those who want a career outside the legal sector, law graduates are increasingly found in a variety of fields such as accountancy, banking and finance, the civil service, the police etc.

How to succeed in Law

You will need a genuine interest in law either due to your work experience or thirst for understanding the world around you. In preparation for the A Level Law course, you would benefit from keeping up to date with current criminal trials that are being reported in the national and local media and any high profile bills that are debated in Parliament. You will need to be able to express your ideas and opinions in writing and apply legal theory to specific scenarios and problems.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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